Oral care for the whole family...

 
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General oral care

General Dentistry

We are proud to deliver a wide range of oral care therapies that will suit your interests and finances; so you can benefit from what Dentistry has best to offer and a healthy smile.

 

Our principles range from the most basic standard of the need to treat patients with dignity, kindness, understanding, courtesy, respect, empathy, compassion and honesty; to patients being given informed advice, being actively involved in making decisions about treatment that is important to them and experiencing care that is tailored to their needs and personal preferences.

There is no need to be nervous or anxious when visiting us. We understand that everyone is different and we will help you to overcome any fears or apprehensions you may have.  We count on the whole Team to overcome your anxiety and meet your expectations.

As well as providing our more specialized services, we still maintain our focus on the provision of the full range of high quality general dentistry based on a foundation of enhancing our patients’ oral health.

We provide fillings, root canal fillings, teeth whitening, crowns, bridges, dentures, mouth guards, splints, extractions and a full range of preventative treatments including hygiene treatment & fluoride application.

At your routine examination appointment we will make a thorough assessment of your current oral health and give you a range of options for treatment: some options may be essential, such as hygiene therapy or treatment to arrest decay or infection; other treatments suggested may be more “cosmetic” such as teeth whitening. We will also check at each appointment for any abnormalities in the soft tissues of the mouth which may be caused by disease such as cancer.

We will spend the appropriate time explaining through your oral condition and exploring treatment options; and we will offer a written treatment plan and you will have a clear understanding of the costs involved before treatment commences.

 Picture of dental X-ray for accurate assessment

Digital Radiography

We may well need to take X-rays to enable a more accurate assessment. We are proud to have digital x-rays at our Clinic, which operates at a reduced level of radiation (less than the normal exposure from background radiation) and produces clear images which are instantly available for treatment planning and discussion.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy can be an exciting time and while you have so much to plan for, your oral health may be one of the last things you're thinking about. But it's more important than ever to pay close attention to your dental health in this time. That's because hormone changes during pregnancy can affect your oral health and many pregnant women notice that their gums are red, inflamed and sometimes bleed when they brush their teeth.

 Happy pregnant lady in the park after dental appointment

The swelling and inflamed gums are referred to as 'pregnancy gingivitis' and can start as soon as the second month of pregnancy. The hormone progesterone can be around 10 times higher than normal during pregnancy, affecting the body's response to toxins as a result of plaque build-up. Women are therefore more susceptible to developing periodontal disease when these hormonal fluctuations occur.

Some women also experience a growth on their gums known as a pregnancy granuloma, which are red nodules usually found on the upper gums. While they are not dangerous, they can cause discomfort. Other oral health problems may include tooth erosion as a result of constant exposure to acid from severe morning sickness. Dry mouth is another major complaint, but can be easily remedied by drinking plenty of water and using sugarless candies to stimulate saliva flow.

 Female dental patient in dentist chair during friendly consultation

If you are pregnant we recommend that you come to the practice for a thorough check up so we can help you to have a healthy and happy pregnancy.

Medical Emergencies

All our team members have regular training in Medical Emergencies.

Honeycomb Dental Clinic is a warm and friendly place, you’re welcomed and made to feel at home upon arrival. Front desk staff are professional, helpful and knowledgeable and there’s always a friendly interaction between patients and staff. My last appointment was for a replacement filling carried out by the dental surgeon. A genuinely nice person. They explained my options and consequent procedures fully and answered all my questions. In the end there was nothing I was unsure about. Application of anesthesia was pretty painless (as usual). The work was carried out confidently and conscientiously; I was frequently asked how I was feeling throughout. I knew I was in very good hands and felt very relaxed. The nurses are wonderful too. They know exactly what they’re doing and assist the dentist in complete symbiosis. It’s a joy to watch real experts at work. What a team!
— Andrew Kennedy

Antibiotic resistance

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Next time you have Antibiotics refused by your Dentist (or GP), please remember, they may be trying to help you…

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats facing us today and the overuse or misuse of antibiotics is making the problem worse. Without effective antibiotics many routine treatments will become increasingly dangerous. Setting broken bones, basic operations, transplants, even chemotherapy all rely on access to antibiotics that work. To slow resistance we need to cut the use of unnecessary antibiotics.

Sepsis is a common cause of death in the UK with over 44,000 deaths each year. More people die from sepsis than lung cancer (35,000) and bowel cancer (16,000) and many of these sepsis deaths are due to untreatable antibiotic resistant infections. If there were no new antibiotics, then any infections become untreatable. The failure to develop new antibiotics is of great concern. Antibiotic resistance is life-threatening, with the young and old being most at risk of resistant infections. This is because these two groups have low immunity, making them more susceptible to infection.

 

More info:

A must-watch from the Harvard Medical School...

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